Introduction- Ruipeng An

Hello everyone,

My name is Ruipeng An, from Beijing, China. I’m a graduate student now, major in Industrial Design at the design school. Since my background is Environmental Engineering(Bachelor degree), I have some knowledge of circuit. I’m also a big fan of PC DIY,  having enough enthusiasm and skills on this. For programming, I only have very little experience in Visual Basic. But I’m trying to learn more about coding for Arduino and Python.

As an industrial design student, I did work with several creative materials for model making, such as foam core, styrene board, wood board, PLA( for 3D printing ), clay, yellow foam, etc.

E.Chromi is my favorite project since the designers found a really interesting and efficient way to test people’s gastrointestinal health. The probiotic yogurt drink they used can be easily accepted by most people without pain, and the test result can be very intuitive since it shows in different colors. This project is so impressive to me because it’s not only user-friendly but also very efficient. I realized that healthcare is not only health workers’ job, designers can change and improve relative experiences indeed.

LED Switch – Michael Maxam

Arduino LED Switch

 

For my switch I tried using pencil lead but did not have any luck. I then switched to some copper conductive tape and was able to get my switch functioning.

Here’s my code. I altered the sample code for button:

 

const int buttonPin = 5;
const int ledPin = 10;
const int led = 9;
int buttonState = 0;
void setup() {

pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
}

void loop(){

buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);
if (buttonState == HIGH) {
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
}
else {
// turn LED off:
digitalWrite(led, HIGH);
delay(1000);
buttonState == LOW;
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);

}
}

And my circuit:

IMG_3901

Arduino Soft Switch – Shomit

coppermushie

I used the example>digital>button code in the Arduino IDE program and added a simple blink code. The soft switch is connected to a pair of copper wool scrubbers which kinda resemble mushroom caps in shape. When the two connect, the green and white LEDs alternately blink. When the copper mushies separate, only the white LED stays on.

Here’s the code:

coppermushiesoftswitchcode

Switch – Hannah Wheeler

In this assignment, I looked at the powerpoint, slide 75, to get a reference for the setup of the circuit. After creating this, I added another loop for the second LED light and set up the pin in the code. Finally, I tried various organic objects, like bananas, oranges, and water but the only thing I could find that would be conductive without fail was metal of some kind. That led me to my earrings where I used alligator clips to open and close the switch.

WheelerHannahSwitchAssignmentCode.pngWheelerHannahSwitchAssignment1

Soft Circuit Carrot- Matt Stockmal

For my project, I decided to experiment with an RGB LED. the idea of the project was to create a switch using a conductive carrot. When the carrot is not completing the circuit, the red negative LED is turned on. When the carrot is plugged in and completing the circuit, the LED will display an orange color (combination of red and green LEDs).

The project uses an RGB led wiring in combination with the standard switch wiring provided in the example. I used a teensy instead of an Arduino. The logic goes as follows: If the carrot is plugged in, digital write the orange LED on, all other time, turn on the Red LED.

 

IMG_20180117_114946Screen Shot 2018-01-17 at 11.44.53 AM.png

 

 

//SOFT CIRCUIT CODE
//combonation of Button Example patch AND adafruit tutorial
//https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-arduino-lesson-3-rgb-leds/arduino-sketch
//MATT STOCKMAL
int redPin = 8;
int greenPin = 30;
int bluePin = 29;
const int buttonPin = 35; // the number of the pushbutton pin
const int ledPin = A17;
int buttonState = 0;
void setup() {
// put your setup code here, to run once:
pinMode(redPin, OUTPUT);
pinMode(greenPin, OUTPUT);
pinMode(bluePin, OUTPUT);
pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
// initialize the pushbutton pin as an input:
pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
// put your main code here, to run repeatedly:
buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);

// check if the pushbutton is pressed.
// if it is, the buttonState is HIGH:
if (buttonState == HIGH) {
// turn LED on:
Serial.println(“ButtonON”);
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
analogWrite(redPin, 0);
analogWrite(greenPin, 90);
analogWrite(bluePin, 255);
}
else {
// turn LED off:
analogWrite(redPin, 255);
analogWrite(greenPin, 255);
analogWrite(bluePin, 255);
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
}
}

void setColor(int red, int green, int blue)
{
red = 255 – red;
green = 255 – green;
blue = 255 – blue;
analogWrite(redPin, red);
analogWrite(greenPin, green);
analogWrite(bluePin, blue);

}

Soft Switch – Damon Amato

For this assignment I decided to use a happy lemon to help me with my switch for this circuit. Since there is acidic juices within the lemon, it’s contents can be used as a conductor for which the current of the circuit would use to pass through when the closing end of the switch is planted within the general area of the other wire thus closing the circuit. When this happens, the white LED turns off and the yellow LED turns on.

 

Here is my circuit up close:

IMG_5168

And here is my code:

const int buttonPin = 2; // the number of the pushbutton pin
const int ledPin = 13;
const int ledPinTwo = 12;

// variables will change:
int buttonState = 0; // variable for reading the pushbutton status

void setup() {
// initialize the LED pin as an output:
pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
pinMode(ledPinTwo, OUTPUT);
// initialize the pushbutton pin as an input:
pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
}

void loop(){
// read the state of the pushbutton value:
buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);

// check if the pushbutton is pressed.
// if it is, the buttonState is HIGH:
if (buttonState == HIGH) {
// turn LED on:
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
digitalWrite(ledPinTwo, HIGH);

}
else {
// turn LED off:
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
digitalWrite(ledPinTwo, LOW);

}
}

Arduino soft switch-Daisy Nolz

I used the “Blink” code on three LED’s in my circuit. I started with one green LED that blinked, then when the switch in the circuit was complete, the other two LED’s would start to blink as well.  The conductive material I used was beer. I was supposed to meet some people for beer and I got curious whether it would work for this project. It did, so I ran with it. This first video is simply us testing to see if the circuit would work. The photo that is next is a snapshot if the breadboard setup, after that the second video is the second iteration of this assignment where the setup is better and I used the minimum requirement of two LED’s. The last video just shows all the connections–the full setup.

IMG_20180117_003854366

 

 

Simple “Blink” code:

 

/*
Blink

Turns an LED on for one second, then off for one second, repeatedly.

Most Arduinos have an on-board LED you can control. On the UNO, MEGA and ZERO
it is attached to digital pin 13, on MKR1000 on pin 6. LED_BUILTIN is set to
the correct LED pin independent of which board is used.
If you want to know what pin the on-board LED is connected to on your Arduino
model, check the Technical Specs of your board at:
https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Products

modified 8 May 2014
by Scott Fitzgerald
modified 2 Sep 2016
by Arturo Guadalupi
modified 8 Sep 2016
by Colby Newman

This example code is in the public domain.

http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Blink
*/

// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board
void setup() {
// initialize digital pin LED_BUILTIN as an output.
pinMode(LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
digitalWrite(LED_BUILTIN, HIGH); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
delay(1000); // wait for a second
digitalWrite(LED_BUILTIN, LOW); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
delay(1000); // wait for a second
}